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Rare footage of rising folk star
Bobby Angel at rest practicing

The thing about being a folk star …

It doesn’t pay the bills.

Bobby Angel practicing before the campfire

For that I’ll have to rely on hydrology for the time being, if not the indefinitely into the future. But early on I also knew: It’s impossible to be a folk star first and then turn into a hydrologist later in life. And really, to be a nature-folk artist of any acclaim, I knew I needed to spend a solid twenty to thirty years (possibly forty to fifty) immersed in understanding all the ins and out of water before I could ever dare to write a song about about the watery stuff, let alone all the other societal ills that only a well-rendered folk song has any chance of making heal.

Am I serious? Probably not. Or maybe a little. The backstory on this song: I wrote it about 15 years ago, almost as an afterthought, and with barely any time to prepare. The protagonist of the song Krista gave us all of a week’s notice that she’d gotten a new job. One day after the next I put the song off until the hour before I scribbled a bunch of notes on the page with just as many cross outs as there was anything legible to read. To my shock, everyone loved it. The only problem was I couldn’t give Krista the lyrics because even I could barely read them myself. And so I typed them up and gave them to her before she left. As I said that was fifteen years ago, probably more with it not being until the last year that I found the lyrics and finally sang it again. And not just sing it, I recorded it and made a musical video. It wasn’t actually until the video that the song “really popped.”

As much as Krista was surprised by the song at the time (and happy to get a copy of the lyrics to hang on her wall), you can image her response when fifteen years later I sent her the video, plus a 15-minute follow up exclusive Bobby Angel interview about the song. Ballad of a Florida Panther would go on to be featured as the first song on Side B of my first album, New Pangaea, released on my website in 2000.

Morale of the story: Try to not wait 15 years before playing a song for a second time. On the other hand, in this case, it worked pretty good.

Calling All Angelheads
Angelhead Newsletter: Vol 2, 2021

Welcome music fans,

I’m Bobby Angel and this is my newsletter.

More about my music, in my own words

My goal? To restore nature one campfire song at a time. If you think that’s far fetched, then I encourage you to give me a second (and third) listen. (Although it isn’t usually until the fourth or fifth that it starts to click.) Granted, I’m not your traditional singer/songwriter. But I feel I have something worthwhile sharing. And I sort of like writing them, too. You know, before the BobbyAngel.Org website, I really didn’t have a reason to write or share my music. I’d sort of sing a song once and that would be it. So another reason is really personal. I just wanted to have a place to park my songs which in turn, now that I have it, gives me a motivation to write new ones.

My primary topic is nature, and how to restore it, and how we as people can better connect with it.

But I write an occasional love song, too.

One of my best “nature folk” ballads

Warning: It’s a tear jerker

Oh yes, and I’ve also produced some albums.

I’m an old school folkie in the tradition of, say, Neil Young or Bob Dylan, who saw the album, not the song, as the broader canvas of their work. Not that I’m on their level.

My most recent album

So welcome to the Angelhead Newsletter and I hope you enjoy.

And please share with a friend.

Yours truly and always,

P.S. If you haven’t already, don’t forget to sign up for the newsletter and you can follow me on social media, too.

Sign up for newsletter | Follow on Twitter | Follow on Facebook

Name Not Chosen
Angelhead Newsletter: Vol 1

Try as we might …

We rarely pick our own name.

Origin of Bobby Angel, in his own words

Or if we do there’s little guarantee that it sticks.

Featured podcast

Nor can we have much hope …

That our life’s work will ever amount to much, let alone pass the test of time. Case in point is the sad scenario presented in my new song – Tear Down – as featured on the Firelight Radio podcast.

Built to be Torn Down
Looking back in life … We like to look back and feel we built something. Or is it all just a tear down?
Built to be Torn Down
Looking back in life … We like to look back and feel we built something. Or is it all just a tear down?

So, what is the meaning of life?

For starters, can I recommend subscribing to the Angelhead Newsletter?

And if you could, also please share with a friend.

Until next time …

Let’s all be good to nature,